Studio Idan - Art & Photography »» Arnaud Baumann

Tag: Arnaud Baumann

CHARLELIE eau secours baumann

Eau Secours

Eau Secours

by Arnaud Baumann

Each droplet that glides over the skin tells a unique story

Quelques mots sur Eau Secours

EAU SECOURS

Water, cradle of life and the original mirror of humanity, reveals its poetry in Arnaud Baumann’s “Eau Secours” collection. Each droplet that glides over the skin tells a unique story, captured with sensitivity by the renowned photographer.

In this artistic exploration, Baumann invites us to introspect our connection with water and nature. These analog prints highlight detail, expression, and emotion. Under the shower, a moment of vulnerability and sincerity, faces reveal themselves, personalities emerge, and stories are whispered silently. This intimate contact with water evokes a range of reactions, from surprise to meditation, ecstasy to melancholy.

More than simple photographs, these images are artworks, signed and numbered by the artist. With his documentarian’s eye and humanist heart, Arnaud Baumann captures fleeting moments of truth. His models, whether artists, writers, scientists, or unknown individuals, share a part of their intimacy, offering a kaleidoscope of society in search of existential answers.

The high-quality prints on metallic paper, where water appears like pearls or precious crystal shards, captivate the eye and invite contemplation.

Each portrait is an invitation to reconnect with the very essence of life.

Jacques-Prince Okoko baumann eau secours

EAU SECOURS

2007-2009 – Fine art prints limited to 26, all sizes included

reiser carnet d'adresses arnaud baumann

Little Black Book

Little Black Book

by Arnaud Baumann

A raw journey through the quest for freedom

A Few Words About Little Black Book

LITTLE BLACK BOOK

Photography, like all art forms, is a quest for something. For oneself? For truth?
For provocation?

Twenty-five years ago, the liberated post-’68 generation could enjoy many pleasures without too much fear of unemployment, not yet of AIDS, and less than today of ideological and religious extremism.

In the ’80s, the imminent fall of the Berlin Wall and a Europe on the move would abolish some of the borders and archaic miseries that had been set up between peoples… We lived in the hope of a better world. A freer world.

My thirst for freedom, combined with a search for identity, led me to have my friends and acquaintances pose for me in the simplest of poses, detached from any aesthetic considerations.
“Little Black Book” (published by DTV), a collection of nude portraits of famous and unknown people, proclaimed the truth of the gaze, without complexes or complacency.

At a time when European agreement is struggling to survive, other threats, climatic or conflictual, are darkening the horizon.

Added to this is the return of the narrow morality of our elders.

My ever-vital quest for truth leads me to risk shock by showing this personal, unbridled but assumed work, the uncompromising work of my early years as a photographer.

Arnaud Baumann, Paris 2024

Autoportrait et ma coiffeuse Katia carnet d'adresses arnaud
Alain Bashung by Arnaud Baumann

★ ICONIC PORTRAITS ★

★ ICONIC PORTRAITS ★

ARNAUD BAUMANN

"his great achievement, his stylistic signature, the radiant portrait."

ICONIC PORTRAITS : The Who’s Who of Arnaud Baumann

Who’s Who is the directory of people who are supposed to be important in the life of a country. The first English edition dates from 1849, the French from 1953. Arnaud Baumann’s more recent, fresher, more unbuttoned Who’s Who began in the ’80s, when as a young photographer, he began to frame in his viewfinder people who mattered, particularly to him. For example, the libertarian squad of the newspaper Hara-Kiri, of which there remains a spirit, a disruptive and ill-bred body of work, a legacy, an offspring, a tragedy – the Charlie Hebdo massacre in January 2015 – and a book-bible, Dans le ventre de Hara Kiri (Éd. La Martinière, 2015), a tumultuous echography produced by Arnaud Baumann with his long-time alter ego, photographer Xavier Lambours. The difference between the ordinary Who’s Who and his is that in his it’s the texts that are brief and secondary, and the photos that are large and important.

If one of his predilections as an artist is portraiture, his favorite exercise, his originality, his great success, his stylistic signature, is the happy portrait. To a large extent, Iconic portraits is an exhibition – and a collector’s book (limited to 100 copies) – about mischief and irony, euphoria and joy, humor, jokes, mischief and self-mockery, which is to derision what self-criticism is to criticism: progress. More than a Who’s Who, it’s a gallery of tableaux-cabrioles, exaggerated mimics, pasquinades, as we used to say in Victor Hugo, stretching from the end of the xxᵉ century to the beginning of the xxiᵉ, while we wait for the rest, because a century is a long time. Even more than a yearbook, it’s a kind of Légende dorée in images, secular, profane, cheerfully pagan, if you leave out Abbé Pierre, Julien Green and a few emeritus heads. More than a golden legend, it’s a multicolored dictionary of biographies written on silver film, from Leica to Polaroid camera. Nostalgic readers will see it as an affectionate, droll, effervescent, Dionysian and sometimes sulphurous repertory – but this sulphur smells of humanity – of a host of milieus and periods that make up a demography of preferences, a selective sociology and, in short, the chosen inventory of a memorialist multiplied in fifteen worlds.

In the end, we find dozens of old acquaintances who, on screens, stages, newspapers, books, art galleries and museums, have accompanied us through our successive ages, and who are a bit like relatives we’ve known, if not in the world, at least in the spectacle of the world, a substitute phantasmagoria in which we undoubtedly live more than in reality. And if many of these long-lost acquaintances have disappeared, most of them, at the time of these portraits, are the embodiment of that kind of happiness of being and vitality of group or couple that radiates from the image when the happiness of being and vitality of the subjects are redoubled by those of the portraitist. A photographer’s portraits, in fact, are also the photographer’s portrait, and each of them, when the subject, photographer and portrait are up to scratch, makes a whole greater than the sum of its parts.

The atmosphere, precisely, is one of celebration, of rest from toil. But from time to time, you need to take a break from rest, not so much from work as from seriousness, anxiety and danger. This is what happens here, without the photographer deviating much from the measured baroque or youthful naturalness that he conveys from the first of his images to the last.

Emil Cioran, tucked away in his attic in the Latin Quarter, a figure of defeated dough, raised towards a skylight he would like to open, or close. Hair as thick as anguish. The face of an abused old child, overwhelmed, slapped in the face by the nasty rectangular light of a Heaven where the persecuting demiurge of the Gnostics has shamelessly taken up residence. Photogeny of the inconsolable. Look no further for a better illustration of disappointed mysticism.

Bashung, for instance. That stork finger on his lips. This finger of finesse with a scarlet nail. That finger that isn’t his, but which suits him so well… The finger of his feminine side, since they say you have to have sides, like with cakes? A queen of hearts? An adorer? Of modesty? Delicacy? Melancholy? Of death? Louis XIII, secret king, dies with an identical gesture or pose, but it was his personal index finger. Silences of the complicated. Imaginative finds.

Like this “Self-portrait with C-gasoline”, in which the photographer, as a deliberate arsonist, takes the stage and pays for it with his own life. The price might have been exorbitant, but in the end it’s less a portrait of gasoline than a portrait of an essence, an ontology, a way of being, a thief of fire, warm, ignited, a risk-taker, yet not a nutcase. This running flame is Prometheus in miniature, unleashed not on his rock at the ends of the earth, but in the Val d’Oise, on the edge of cartoonist Siné’s fire-extinguisher pool.

Baumann, referring to his portrait of elderly Philippe Soupault, overloaded with ninety-two years of memories and as if appalled, he the surrealist, to have spent an entire existence in a reality that is eventually nothing but smoke: “Undressing can also mean showing one’s wrinkles, the passing of time. To be able to accept death (…) A portrait is successful, I think, when it reaches that dimension. Nakedness.

The question is: THE EXPOSURE OF WHAT EXACTLY?

The answer comes from Jean Paulhan: “People gain from being known. They gain in mystery. That’s the great thing about human beings: if you happen to discover the mystery they are at first, you’re bound to discover the enigma they are afterwards. So, who’s who?

And what is Iconic Portraits, if not a concentration and pileup of revealing rebus, like any true portrait exhibition? But an invigorating concentration and pileup, because if no exhibition or book of the living has ever been so lively, no exhibition or book of the dead has ever been so cheerful, restless, motley, variable, energetic, offbeat, whimsical and inventive.

Michel Wichegrod 2024 

"That stork finger on her lips. That finger of finesse with the scarlet nail. That finger that isn't hers but suits her so well..."

Michel Wichegrod

★ ICONIC PORTRAITS ★

Original prints signed and numbered by Arnaud Baumann - Edition of 26 in all formats.

Le Palace

Le Palace

by Arnaud Baumann

“A period of carefreeness, beauty born from the mixture of genres and atmospheres”

A Few Words About Le Palace

“Works created during memorable evenings at the Palace, which are now part of the photographic heritage and bear witness to a bygone and inimitable reality”

LE PALACE

April 1978, Le Palace opened its doors. Like the famous Studio 54 in New York, this essential Parisian nightclub marked its era well beyond its walls and remains, even today, the symbol of enjoyment, freedom and carelessness.

Its relentless evenings bring together, alongside French and international stars from the world of music, fashion and cinema: people who come to party without taboos or limits. A rhythmic melting pot of sounds of pleasure, intoxication and disinhibition make this place one of the pillars of the emergence of gay culture.

Markers of an era and a carefree vision of life, the extravagance and freedom of the Palace parties will never be matched.

 

 

THE WORKS OF ARNAUD BAUMANN

The famous portraitist Arnaud Baumann made his debut there. For five years, he wandered among explosions of life and pleasure to offer us a unique vision: documentary and visual style photography whose long exposures make the colored lasers twirl and transport us to the heart of the party. His images, authentic and uninhibited, make us want to reconnect with the lightness of the time, to be able to be free.

Photographs of Le Palace in color are hard to come by. Arnaud Baumann makes them all the more lively and alluring with his original vision. Similar to a painter, he uses his camera like a brush and recreates in his images the laser-colored atmosphere of the intense nights of the famous Parisian nightclub.

Taken on Kodachrome film almost half a century ago, these images printed on metallic archival silver paper have already become vintage. Between visuals and archival documents, they are still accessible but inevitably destined to increase in value.

Arnaud Baumann’s photographs constitute an authentic testimony to the history of the arts, dance and pop culture through the exhilarating interlude offered by Le Palace.

Joie débordante

LE PALACE

April 1978, Le Palace opened its doors. Like the famous Studio 54 in New York, this essential Parisian nightclub marked its era well beyond its walls and remains, even today, the symbol of enjoyment, freedom and carelessness.

Its relentless evenings bring together, alongside French and international stars from the world of music, fashion and cinema: people who come to party without taboos or limits. A rhythmic melting pot of sounds of pleasure, intoxication and disinhibition make this place one of the pillars of the emergence of gay culture.

Markers of an era and a carefree vision of life, the extravagance and freedom of the Palace parties will never be matched.

 

 

 

THE WORKS OF ARNAUD BAUMANN

The famous portraitist Arnaud Baumann made his debut there. For five years, he wandered among explosions of life and pleasure to offer us a unique vision: documentary and visual style photography whose long exposures make the colored lasers twirl and transport us to the heart of the party. His images, authentic and uninhibited, make us want to reconnect with the lightness of the time, to be able to be free.

Photographs of Le Palace in color are hard to come by. Arnaud Baumann makes them all the more lively and alluring with his original vision. Similar to a painter, he uses his camera like a brush and recreates in his images the laser-colored atmosphere of the intense nights of the famous Parisian nightclub.

Taken on Kodachrome film almost half a century ago, these images printed on metallic archival silver paper have already become vintage. Between visuals and archival documents, they are still accessible but inevitably destined to increase in value.

Arnaud Baumann’s photographs constitute an authentic testimony to the history of the arts, dance and pop culture through the exhilarating interlude offered by Le Palace.

Monsieur Pipi au naturel

“He does not reproduce reality; he does not capture reality; he thinks it and he sees it."

Pacôme Thiellement, essayist

LE PALACE

1978–1983 – Silver prints on metallic paper, limited to 20 copies (all sizes included)